NIME 2018 Workshop: Re-engaging the Body and Gesture in Musical Live Coding

Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1POiR5WJJmwDgcSTD9w-SMuDvIOU5yofsJdLnWFIccPE/viewform

As part of the New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME 2018) conference, we would like to invite you to the “Re-engaging the Body and Gesture in Musical Live Coding” workshop. This half-day workshop will take place Sunday, June 3, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia.

The goal of this workshop is to explore the multifaceted relationships between live coding, gesture, and embodiment in musical performance. In particular, we seek to critically assess the current state of affairs as pertains to live coding and gesturality, and further propose and evaluate new ideas for synthesizing the two. We will offer an opportunity for participants to compare experiences, reflect on their own work, and discuss ways to impart gestural and embodied interactions in musical live coding.

Further context on these ideas can be found in the workshop paper at: https://embodiedlivecoding.github.io/nime2018-workshop/workshop-paper.html

The workshop will emphasize both an open discussion and a hands-on prototyping activity. During the latter, participants will propose and mock up forward-thinking systems for gestural live coding, using either software or provided physical materials. Despite the subject matter, programming ability is not a prerequisite, and the organizers encourage participation from individuals of diverse creative and technical backgrounds.

The workshop is open to conference attendees but attendance may be limited based on the amount of available hardware. No preparation is required to attend, but if you are planning to attend, we would encourage you to contact Spencer Salazar (ssalazar@calarts.edu) or Jack Armitage (j.d.k.armitage@qmul.ac.uk) so we can ensure that adequate materials are available.

We look forward to meeting you in Blacksburg.

Warmly, The Re-engaging the Body and Gesture in Musical Live Coding Workshop organizers

Spencer Salazar[1] and Jack Armitage[2]

[1] The Herb Alpert School of Music, California Institute of the Arts

[2] Augmented Instruments Laboratory, Centre for Digital Music, Queen Mary University of London